Home » Novels by Aldous Huxley: Brave New World, List of Quotes From Shakespeare in Brave New World, Island, Ape and Essence, After Many a Summer by Books LLC
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This is nonfiction commentary. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Brave New World, List of Quotes From Shakespeare in Brave New World,MoreThis is nonfiction commentary. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Brave New World, List of Quotes From Shakespeare in Brave New World, Island, Ape and Essence, After Many a Summer, the Genius and the Goddess, Point Counter Point, Antic Hay, Eyeless in Gaza, Crome Yellow, Those Barren Leaves. Source: Wikipedia. Free updates online. Not illustrated. Excerpt: Brave New World is a novel by Aldous Huxley, written in 1931 and published in 1932. Set in the London of AD 2540 (632 A.F. in the book), the novel anticipates developments in reproductive technology and sleep-learning that combine to change society. The future society is an embodiment of the ideals that form the basis of futurism. Huxley answered this book with a reassessment in an essay, Brave New World Revisited (1958), and with his final work, a novel titled Island (1962), both summarized below. In 1999, the Modern Library ranked Brave New World fifth on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century. Brave New Worlds ironic title derives from Mirandas speech in Shakespeares The Tempest, Act V, Scene I: This line is word-by-word quoted in the novel by John the Savage, when he first sees Lenina. The expression brave new world also appears in Emile Zolas Germinal (1885): and in Rudyard Kiplings 1919 poem The Gods of the Copybook Headings: Translations of the novel into other languages often allude to similar expressions used in domestic works of literature in an attempt to capture the same irony: the French edition of the work is entitled Le Meilleur des mondes (The Best of All Worlds), an allusion to an expression used by the philosopher Gottfried Leibniz and satirized in Candide, Ou lOptimisme by Voltaire (1759). The German title of the book is Schone Neue Welt (Beautiful New World). First the word brave was translated to Tapfe...More: http: //booksllc.net/?id=3668